November 22, 2022
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2 minutes

Long live the holidays, the "quiche lorraine" effect and the mastery of the French language

Every week Offishall reads the press and scours the articles related to hybrid work. Here's our pick of the top three pieces of content over the past seven days.

Long live the holidays, the "quiche lorraine" effect and the mastery of the French language

Every week, Offishall reads the press and scours the articles related to hybrid work. Here's our pick of the top three pieces of content over the past seven days:

Teleworking promotes holidays

The All Saints' Day holidays are not usually a crucial period for tourism professionals. But this year the sector is in full swing and this is obviously due to the boom in teleworking, whether or not mixed with days off, as we learn from this article in Le Figaro. As regards the most popular destinations for these (tele)holidaymakers, the overseas territories are recording almost 200% more bookings than in 2019 on the Pap.fr website. Rural areas are also benefiting from this trend with +125% of bookings in the countryside. If remote working from a holiday location is taking off, it can be facilitated by setting up availability schedules within the day; an issue explored in the second article that caught our attention this week:

The "quiche lorraine" effect or reframed availability in telework

Telework is a new phenomenon:"the distinction between "working hours" and "availability periods" within them ", as stated in this column published in Le Monde. Signed by the academic Jean-Emmanuel Ray, this text tells us about the existence of certain telework agreements providing for time slots of availability within the day. An example is the Garance company, which offers a formula whereby the employee can"interrupt his or her work to pursue personal interests from 7 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., and then from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.: ideal for school or preparing quiche lorraine, the maximum daily span of thirteen hours being respected", says the columnist. A formula that undoubtedly allows the company to avoid the legal uncertainty surrounding possible (tele)work accidents, at a time when many organisations are wondering about employee insurance when they are working remotely; if they injure themselves while mowing their lawn during working hours, who will pay for their accident?
The Club Med agreement also provides that " in consultation with the employee, the manager will set the time slots during which he or she may contact the employee. During these periods, the employee will be under the subordination of the employer and will not be able to go about his or her personal business. The author concludes with a convoluted formulation of what he considers to be "the fundamental problem" of this availability - making a diversion into the inequality between white and blue collar workers in the face of distance work. In his opinion, the key to the success of telework lies in a management of trust, and especially not in restrictive rules that are out of step with the desires and needs of teleworkers. He points to "the increasing unsuitability of Taylorian rules denying any autonomy to manual workers in factories, to knowledge workers in their homes, where only trust can avoid gas plants with double inverted pipes".

Teleworking: recruiters more attentive to French language skills

The rise of teleworking has favoured written communications, leading to a growing awareness among managers and recruiters: more than three quarters of French employers say they are confronted with spelling and grammatical errors every day. The Ipsos study reported in Les Echos reveals that mistakes are "prohibitive for a large majority of employers, both in writing and speaking. This requirement "has increased with the pandemic and the generalisation of teleworking: at a distance and in writing, clarity of expression is a must", the article states. To the extent that the quality of spelling and expression of candidates is now in the top five recruitment criteria for a majority of HR managers. The journalist Anna Lippert points out that mistakes in expression are also an obstacle to promotion. Finally, for the overwhelming majority of recruiters, these shortcomings can be detrimental to customer relations in addition to affecting the company's productivity.

Edmée Citroën

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